DIY: Pin and Button Storage

by Veronica Nunez

August 15, 2020

I’ve been looking for a system to store my pin collection which would also make it easier to find specific pins for wearing. I found two tutorials on YouTube and made tweaks of my own to fit my needs. In the process of organizing my pins I found that a minor modification was useful for storing my buttons. I don’t actively collect buttons, but I receive so many from Comic-Cons and various events. I also have a collection of buttons from my time working at Disneyland.

As always, feel free to customize this system as you wish.

Supplies:

1 large 3-ring binder

Self-adhesive felt sheets

Self-adhesive foam

Cutting mat and rotary cutter or scissors

Page Protectors

Option 1 Directions:

  1. Remove the adhesive from the back of the foam, and lay the foam on your clean work surface with the adhesive side facing up.
  2. Peel back the top one inch of the backing from the felt. (Working from on the short side is easiest.)
  3. Line up the edge sof the exposed section of the adhesive side of the felt to the adhesive side of the foam. Once they are attached, slide the rest of the backing paper off of the felt as you slide your other hand along the felt pressing it onto the foam.
  4. Once the felt is completely attached to the foam, use a cutting mat and rotary cutter to trim the sheet to the size you need. I needed my sheets to be approximately 8 inches by 10 and a half inches. Hint: Trim a small amount on each side rather than the entire amount at once. The sheets of felt are 9-inches by 11 inches and the foam was 9 inches by 12 inches. I cut the length to 11 inches, then the other edge to 10 and half inches. I cut one side of the short length from 9 inches to 8 and one half inches, then the other short side was cut down to 8 and one quarter inches.
  5. I found these page protectors which have a lip which folds over the top of the page.
  6. Insert the completed pages in the binder. I found this binder on the Staples.com website for a lot less than it was listed on Amazon.

Option 2 Directions:

  1. Follow all of the instructions above, but use two self-adhesive felt sheets attached to each other rather than one felt and one foam sheet.

You can see that the sheets with the two sheets of felt are not as thick or as firm which makes them perfect for storing buttons.

DIY Stranger Things Skirt

Stranger Things Inspired Skirt

July 25, 2019

finished skirt

Less than a week before San Diego Comic-Con, I decided to make a Stranger Things inspired skirt.  It had been on my mind since last October when I attended my “niece’s” Stranger Things themed birthday party.  I ordered a vintage floral bedsheet off of Ebay which was brand new in its original packaging. Unfortunately, due to the packaging I didn’t see that the floral pattern was only along the top edge and not throughout the sheet.  I quickly found 2 more bedsheets, 1 twin size and 1 full size, on Ebay and placed the orders crossing my fingers at least one would arrive in time.

2019-07-11 21.00.15
Cut pieces, pre-stained

 

Bedsheets can be great for making skirts and dresses from, especially in this case since I want a vintage style/color/pattern.  I also didn’t have much time before we left for San Diego, and I would be hand-sewing the skirt because I don’t know how to use a sewing machine.  The two sheets arrived a day apart, and though the full size would have been easier to work with cutting wise, the twin size had a better pattern and coloring.  The twin sheet I used was by Room Concepts in the Michele pattern, and it was a “flannelette” 50/50 cotton-polyester blend.  I had four days until we left for San Diego.

I washed both sheets in hot water to remove any sizing and smells they may have from their age, and dried them on high heat as well.  I used a skirt I have to make a rough pattern (I have a pattern packed away somewhere from when I made my Star Wars skirt, but I couldn’t find it) on some butcher paper we have.  I also traced a rough oval using my hand for sizing reference to add pockets to my skirt.  I used this pattern to cut the fabric.  After the fabric was cut, I tea-stained the cut pieces to get the colors a bit older looking and a bit darker.  The sheet had a cream color background, but I wanted it to be a bit more brownish.

2019-07-12 21.24.42
Original fabric on the left and tea-stained fabric on the right 

 

 

 

 

I washed the pieces again after tea-staining, and there was an unfortunate amount of fraying along most of the edges, but I cut larger than normal edges in case this happened.  The tea-staining made the fabric more wrinkled than before so I had to iron the pieces prior to painting the alphabet onto the back and front pieces.  I used the Soft fabric paint by Tulip in Ebony and a natural bristle ¾” paint brush I had on hand to paint the letters.  I started with the back section of the skirt in case I screwed it up.  This was done at midnight on the Saturday night before San Diego Comic-Con because we had been at a friend’s birthday party all afternoon/night.  I got up early on Sunday morning to paint the front section of the skirt since the back side was now dry.  We don’t have a lot of space for me to lay both sides to dry where my cat, Nick Furry, can’t get his hair all over it.  I let the paint air dry on its own for about 2 hours, then I used a hair dryer to get the spots which were taking longer to dry due to thicker layers of paint.

Back of Skirt (1)
Back side of skirt

While the front side paint was drying I temporarily altered a full-length white petticoat/crinoline I had on hand.  I do have a shorter one, but it’s a dark-ish blue, and I felt that it was too dark to wear under the sheet fabric.  Tea-staining does help with the transparency issue most sheets have, though the flannelette is thicker than most sheets.   I used a lot of safety pins to pull up the outer layer of the petticoat to the waist, then I “hemmed” the underskirt/lining with safety pins from the bottom.  Pinning from the bottom helped give some extra poof, too.

Front of skirt
Front side of skirt; note the frayed edges

Since I had been thinking about making this skirt since October, I had purchased two small battery operated Christmas lights from Michaels during Christmas time.  They’re the LED and the perfect classic shape, but I wished they had a blinking option.  Sunday, Monday (after work), and Tuesday morning I sewed all of the pieces together, but I hadn’t given enough space to slide the 1” wide elastic for the waist (due to my painting the letters too high), so I had to use some thinner elastic which isn’t as strong.  Like I mentioned before, I don’t know how to sew and an elastic waistband is all I can really do.  The flannelette fabric is also stretchy, and I have no experience working with stretchy fabric

We were leaving for San Diego at 11am on Tuesday so it was crunch time.   I tried on the petticoat and skirt to see if I needed to make further adjustments to the petticoat.  It did need another 2 inches shortened on the interior lining, but the skirt was ready to have the lights pinned to it.  I wanted to have one battery pack in each pocket, so I put the battery pack inside the pocket and safety-pinned the lights going from the battery to the end of the light strand.  I pinned from the under the skirt putting the pin through the two cords which made up the light strand.   I need to get a third strand or maybe one much longer strand of lights to make the skirt better.

2019-07-18 17.53.53
Please excuse how tired and sweaty I am in this picture.

I received a lot of compliments on my skirt when I wore it on the first day, Thursday, of Comic Con even though I only had the lights one when I was on the exhibition floor or when I was volunteering in the Hall H line later that evening.  You couldn’t see the lights in the bright sunlight, but they still had a great effect.  Some of the nice comments I didn’t even hear as people would say something to their friends as I passed by them on the Exhibition floor, but my boyfriend was walking behind me and he heard them.  So the moral of the story is to not let your inexperience keep you from trying something.